Gross Motor | Scooter Board for Therapy & Special Needs (2022)

Sturdy plastic tummy Scooter Board with handles ideal for Occupational Therapy and Children/Teens with additional needs.

Approximate Scooter Board Dimension:(W )40 cm x (L) 40 cm.

10 funs things to do on a Scooter Board:

  • Body Bowling. Set up bowling pins at one end of the room, and have the child ride the scooter board down to knock them over.
  • Fishing. Scatter magnetic fish around the floor and have the child go find them all.
  • Superman catch.
  • Pull the child around with a rope or a hula hoop.
  • Do a puzzle. Have the puzzle pieces at one end of the room, and the puzzle board at the other end.
  • Sorting. Have bean bags or other objects at one end of the room that can be sorted into containers at the other end of the room.
  • Shopping. Place play food around the room, and you tell them what they need to find and get.
  • Obstacle course of things you need to scoot around.
  • Place cones around the room, and give the child ping pong balls that they have to place on top of the cones.
  • Follow a path of tape placed on the floor.

Safety

Scooter Boards for therapy should be used under adult supervision at all times.

Using a Scooter Board safely :

(Video) Gross Motor Activities | Help 4 Special

  • Scooter Boards are intended for indoor use only
  • Do not exceed the weight capacity
  • Never allow a child to stand on a scooter board
  • Only one child at a time should ride a scooter board
  • Do not use on stairs
  • Do not ride backwards

Take a look at our Scooter Board Fun Deck

Delivery

Products that are in stock andordered before 2pm, Monday to Friday, will bedespatched onthe same working day.

Sensory Direct's Weighted Blankets, Lap Pads, Weighted Jackets and other handmade products may take 3-4 working days to be despatchedif not in stock.We will endeavour to contact customers whose orders may be affected by any despatch delays.

Please note that we close our warehouse & sales office over all UK Bank Holidays & Christmas Eve through to New Year. Despatchwill nottake place during this time.

You can check the status of your order at any time by logging into your customer account via our website. A Customer Account will need to be created before placing an order, to use the order tracking service. Please read our ‘How do I place an order’ FAQ for information on how to do this.

  • Delivery is FREE on orders of £45 and above within Mainland UK (excluding Highlands, Offshore Islands & Northern Ireland).
  • Mainland UK delivery charges are £2.95/£3.95 Royal Mail and £5.95 for courier delivery for orders under £45. (see FAQ for further courier delivery times)
  • Small items are sent by Royal Mail Recorded Delivery. Larger items are sent by DPD for next day delivery. For smaller items that are in stock and ordered before the 2pm cut off time, you can now select and pay for DPD next day delivery at the checkout stage.
  • Please note we cannot deliver to a PO Box address.
  • We are currently unable to ship overseas unless you hold a trade account with us.

Our despatch team will arrange for all orders before 2pm to be despatched on the same day from our warehouse to our designated courier service. Please note that the estimated delivery times are provided by the courier and we do not have any control or influence over these. (see FAQ for further courier delivery times). We will do our best to deliver your order on time however delivery times are approximate, and we accept no liability in respect of late deliveries. If your order is required urgently or by a certain date, please email info@sensorydirect.com and we will do what we can to meet your deadline.

(Video) Fine and Gross Motor Skills for Children with Special Needs

On receipt of your order please open all packages and thoroughly check the goods for damage as soon as possible. You must notify Sensory Direct of any damage within 3 days of the delivery. If we are not notified of damage within 3 days we are unable to claim from the carrier and we will be unable to refund or replace the damaged items. If the packaging appears damaged and you do not have time to check the goods you should sign the carriers paperwork and add the word "Damaged".

Non receipt of your order must be notified to Sensory Direct within 7 days of receipt of your order acknowledgement.

Please see our FAQs for further inforamtion or email us on info@sensorydirect.com or call us M-F 0900 - 1700 on 01905 670500

Returns:

We want you to be 100% happy with your purchase, but if you find that the product is not suitable you must return the goods to us within 30 days of receipt for a refund or exchange of the same or similar. There are some exemptions to this, please see below with regards to Sensory Direct Weighted Blankets. Returns of a sales item must be within 14 days of receipt.

To receive a refund or exchange, goods must be returned unused, in their original packaging and with all original documentation. It is not possible for us to make a refund or exchange if the goods returned are not in perfect condition or it is obvious to us that the goods have been used. Refunds for goods which are returned used, in an unsaleable condition or after 30 days will be at the discretion of Sensory Direct (UK) Ltd.

Is there anything that cannot be returned?:

Yes. We have a small number of products that due to hygiene reasons are not eligible for returns if any of their packaging has been opened. These are:

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  • All Chewbuddy™ products & all other branded sensory chews and bangles.
  • All Putty*/ Sand/ Clay/ PlayFoam (*unless the inner protective bag remains unopened)
  • High Fidelity Ear Plugs and Ear Defenders (Silicone Sensory Ear Plugs are non-returnable due to the nature of their packaging)

Sensory Direct’s Weighted Blankets:

Blankets that have been opened and used will be subject to a £40 fee (+vat where applicable) which will be deducted from your refund. Refunds cannot be given for weighted blankets after 60 days from the date of receipt or where they are returned dirty, soiled or damaged. Refunds on weighted blankets are at the discretion of Sensory Direct and we reserve the right to refuse refunds.

Our Weighted Blankets and Lap Pads carry a ‘Lifetime Guarantee’. If your Weighted Blanket or Lap Pad develops a fault, please call our friendly Customer Services Team on 01905 670 500, 09:00 – 17:00, Monday to Friday and they will happily arrange a repair or replacement.

Trade customers:

Goods purchased by trade customers and distributors may not be returned unless the goods are faulty or sent in error.

Returns Process:

Please ensure you complete aRETURNS FORM with your Purchase Order Reference ( e.g. SO048123 - you will find this on your paperwork or through our Sales office) when sending back your goods . You will find the Returns Form with your order. Please email info@sensorydirect.comif you need a replacement form or cannot find your reference number.Without a completed returns form it is likely to delay your refund.

Faulty Products:

(Video) Improving your child's fine motor and gross motor skills

Please contact our service team either by phone on 01905 670500 or by emailing info@sensorydirect.com where we can advice you on our process.

What is the cost of returning a product?:

Unless the goods are faulty or sent in error you are responsible for the cost of returning the goods to us. We recommend you use recorded delivery and obtain insurance, as proof of posting is not proof of receipt. Where goods are not faulty or sent in error only the cost of the goods excluding postage & packing will be refunded. For further information, please contact our sales office for further advise.

Shortages &Non receipt

Shortages and breakages must be reported to Sensory Direct within 3 days of receiving your order. Non receipt of an order must be reported to Sensory Direct within 7 days of notification of despatch.

Please see full

Use our FAQs for further information.

Postal Address: Sensory Direct (UK) Ltd, Unit 11 Great Western Business Park, McKenzie Way, Worcester. WR4 9GN

(Video) Autism#occupational therapy #Gross motor skills

Contact Number: 01905 670500

Email: info@sensorydirect.com

Working hours: M-F 0900 – 17:00

FAQs

What is a scooter board used for? ›

A scooter board is a fun sensory toy and developmental tool often used by occupational therapists and teachers. These boards provide loads of sensory input – mainly vestibular and proprioceptive – responsible for your child's balance, body awareness, and coordination.

Are scooter boards safe? ›

Manufacturers recommend that players not stand on scooter boards; using it as a skateboard will eventually result in injury.

How do you use a floor scooter? ›

Start prone (belly) on the scooter, have your child use his arms to reach forward, place open palms on the floor and pull to propel himself forward across the floor. Decrease the challenge by using both arms simultaneously.

What muscles do scooter boards work? ›

Building lower body strength at the hips, knees and ankles helps with tasks like walking up hills, running, jumping and even with sports injury prevention. When sitting, lifting their arms or legs off the board it works the core muscles – the muscles of the tummy and back.

What is proprioceptive sensory input? ›

Proprioceptive input is sensory input to activate the joints and muscles to become more responsive. Proprioceptive input should be applied every 2 hours. It can improve muscle tone, coordination, and calming of the brain. Some of our favorite activities are listed below.

How do you ride a scooter board? ›

5 SCOOTER BOARD EXERCISES TO TEACH KIDS - YouTube

How do you ride a scooter? ›

How To Ride an Electric Scooter Safely | 5 Super Easy Tips - YouTube

What is vestibular input? ›

In it's simplest form, vestibular input is the sensation of any change in position, direction, or movement of the head. The receptors are located in the inner ear and are activated by the fluid in the ear canals moving as you move.

How do you play scooter tag? ›

P.E. Games - Scooter Tag - YouTube

What causes poor proprioception? ›

Causes for impaired proprioception

The risk of proprioception loss increases as we age due to a combination of natural age-related changes to the nerves, joints, and muscles. Examples of injuries and conditions that can cause proprioceptive deficit include: brain injuries. herniated disc.

How do you test a child for proprioception? ›

By placing stickers on children's hands, covering their eyes, and then moving their hands, the examiner can see whether the children reach for where their hands and stickers were previously located or to their new location, which serves as an indicator of proprioception ability.

What age should a child ride a scooter? ›

Kids as young as age 1 can be able to successfully navigate a scooter, said pediatric physical therapist Lauren Drobnjak. Parents can look for certain signs of readiness, like being able to transition surfaces when walking—from road to grass, for example, or over curb.

At what age can a child ride a scooter? ›

Once they have mastered the skill of balance & coordination, that is when a 2-wheel scooter is on the horizon. Most three wheel scooters have a recommended starting age of 3 years old.

Which foot do you push on a scooter? ›

At the end of the day, whatever's most comfortable and most effective will be correct. If you're still unsure, try riding with your left foot on the deck, being pushed by your right foot, then swap to your right foot on the deck. You'll quickly find out which is more comfortable.

Is it hard to ride a motor scooter? ›

They're easy to use: Almost all scooters are entirely automatic - just twist the throttle and go! There's no need for a clutch or shifting.

How do you ride a motor scooter for the first time? ›

How to RIDE a SCOOTER/MOPED! - YouTube

What is the safest scooter? ›

What are the safest electric scooters for 2022?
  • Ninebot Segway KickScooter ES2.
  • Ninebot Segway KickScooter MAX.

What are vestibular exercises? ›

Vestibular exercises merely stimulate the vestibular apparatus. This stimulation produces information to be processed by the brain. The goal in repeating these exercises is for the brain to learn to tolerate and accurately interpret this type of stimulation.

What is vestibular autism? ›

Individuals with vestibular dysfunction have difficulty integrating space, gravity, balance, and movement information. These difficulties can result in autistic children being under- sensitive to movement, extra-sensitive to movement, or a combination of both.

What are vestibular sensory activities? ›

Riding a tricycle or a bike, going down the slide, swinging, jumping on a trampoline, swimming, running; these are all great sources of vestibular input! In fact, you have likely done them with your child without even knowing that you were benefitting his/her vestibular system.

What is Jelly tag game? ›

Jellyfish Tag - YouTube

What is scooter hockey? ›

Scooter hockey is an athletic event that focuses on aerobic and anaerobic activity. Both of these increase cardiovascular fitness. Additionally, the sport of scooter hockey targets the muscles in player's legs specifically. Rules: Each team should consist of 5 scooters, including a goalie on each team.

What is Scooter soccer? ›

Explain to the players that this game is similar to indoor soccer. The most significant modifications are: each player is seated on a scooter, the ball may touch people's hands but they cannot use their hands to propel the ball, and more players can compete on the floor at any given time.

How do you ride a scooter board? ›

5 SCOOTER BOARD EXERCISES TO TEACH KIDS - YouTube

How do you ride a scooter? ›

How To Ride an Electric Scooter Safely | 5 Super Easy Tips - YouTube

What is vestibular input? ›

In it's simplest form, vestibular input is the sensation of any change in position, direction, or movement of the head. The receptors are located in the inner ear and are activated by the fluid in the ear canals moving as you move.

What age should a child ride a scooter? ›

Kids as young as age 1 can be able to successfully navigate a scooter, said pediatric physical therapist Lauren Drobnjak. Parents can look for certain signs of readiness, like being able to transition surfaces when walking—from road to grass, for example, or over curb.

At what age can a child ride a scooter? ›

Once they have mastered the skill of balance & coordination, that is when a 2-wheel scooter is on the horizon. Most three wheel scooters have a recommended starting age of 3 years old.

Which foot do you push on a scooter? ›

At the end of the day, whatever's most comfortable and most effective will be correct. If you're still unsure, try riding with your left foot on the deck, being pushed by your right foot, then swap to your right foot on the deck. You'll quickly find out which is more comfortable.

Is it hard to ride a motor scooter? ›

They're easy to use: Almost all scooters are entirely automatic - just twist the throttle and go! There's no need for a clutch or shifting.

How do you ride a motor scooter for the first time? ›

How to RIDE a SCOOTER/MOPED! - YouTube

What is the safest scooter? ›

What are the safest electric scooters for 2022?
  • Ninebot Segway KickScooter ES2.
  • Ninebot Segway KickScooter MAX.

What are vestibular exercises? ›

Vestibular exercises merely stimulate the vestibular apparatus. This stimulation produces information to be processed by the brain. The goal in repeating these exercises is for the brain to learn to tolerate and accurately interpret this type of stimulation.

What is vestibular autism? ›

Individuals with vestibular dysfunction have difficulty integrating space, gravity, balance, and movement information. These difficulties can result in autistic children being under- sensitive to movement, extra-sensitive to movement, or a combination of both.

What are vestibular sensory activities? ›

Riding a tricycle or a bike, going down the slide, swinging, jumping on a trampoline, swimming, running; these are all great sources of vestibular input! In fact, you have likely done them with your child without even knowing that you were benefitting his/her vestibular system.

Videos

1. Visual Tracking Toy by Special Needs in Motion [DIY 3/4" PVC Therapy Tool]
(Special Needs In Motion)
2. 10 CALMING ACTIVITIES USING A SCOOTER BOARD // Sensory Motor Integration Techniques
(The Sensory Corner)
3. How to Build Your Own Gross Motor Board Game
(Moving with Ms. Janell- Pediatric PT)
4. BOT-2 Overview
(Warren McAdams, PT, DPT)
5. Gross Motor Balancing Activities | Help 4 Special
(Help 4 Special)
6. Make Your Own Floor Sitter [DIY Floor Sitter]
(Special Needs In Motion)

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